Vazhaipazham Sakkarai Pongal| Banana Sweet Pongal

Vazhaipazham Sakkarai Pongal is a lovely twist to the regular sweet pongal that is commonly prepared in South India on auspicious occasions. Adding bananas elevates the taste of the sweet pongal up by several notches, and is a great way to get the goodness of the fruits in. This little touch makes the regular sakkarai pongal more exotic, makes it just perfect to serve guests on parties and other festive occasions.

This is a simple pressure-cooker recipe that can be put together in a matter of minutes. I’m sure it will be much loved by people of all age groups, including fussy kids. My daughter absolutely adores this!

Let’s now check out the recipe for this Vazhaipazham Sakkarai Pongal aka Banana Sweet Pongal, shall we?

Advertisements

Coconut & Mango Pulav

Coconut and mango is a classic combination that is much loved. The two flavours marry well, which is why they are found together in a variety of foods. The dish that I present to you today – Coconut & Mango Pulav – uses this classic combination, in a very Indian way.

This delicious pulav makes for a lovely change from the usual. It is a pressure-cooker dish that can be put together in mere minutes, making it the perfect candidate for lunch or dinner on busy weekdays and lazy weekends. This is something kids will love too!

Check out the recipe, just in on my photo blog!

Cocktail Idli Flowers| Beetroot, Carrot & Spinach Mini Idlis

Toddlerhood – the time when a child is between 1 and 3 years of age – is a precious phase. This is the time when kids are at their most notorious, driving their parents up the wall every so often – yet, this is when they are at their most vulnerable and adorable best. This is also when the time when they are exploring the world around them, food included. They are slowly learning to navigate the world, understand what they like and what they don’t and, as parents, it is our duty to help them do just that. In terms of food, toddlers should be exposed to a variety of finger foods – stuff they can easily hold in their little hands and eat on their own. This has a number of benefits, from improvement in gross and fine motor co-ordination and sensory integration to improved bonding with the parents and a deeper sense of ‘home’.

This week, the theme at Foodie Monday Blog Hop is just that – #ToddlerFingerFoods. For this theme, which is super close to my heart, I decided to prepare one of the bub’s favourite toddler snacks – pretty Cocktail Idli Flowers or naturally coloured mini idlis arranged into flowers.

Check out the recipe, just in on my photo blog!

Mumbai Vada Pav Recipe| How To Make Vada Pav

Vada Pav is one of the lifelines of the Maharashtrian city of Mumbai, ranking right up there with the city’s bus transport and suburban railway systems. It is common man’s food, very pocket-friendly, easily available on the streets at any time of the day (or night). The Mumbaikars are known to grab a vada pav off a street-side stall, and eat it on the go, on the way to work or while travelling for personal errands.

Today, I present to you the recipe for Mumbai-style vada pav, a yummylicious snack much loved by all and sundry.

Check out the recipe, on my photo blog!

Cheese & Curried Babycorn Sandwich| Babycorn Masala Sandwich With Cheese

Here’s presenting a Cheese & Curried Babycorn Sandwich or Babycorn Masala Sandwich With Cheese, something I tried out recently and all of us loved. I have used tender babycorn to make the filling here, curried Indian-style. Paired with some cheese and tomato ketchup, the babycorn filling tastes just amazing!

The recipe is up on my photo blog!

Choclo Al Comino| Peruvian Style Corn With Cumin & Lemon

Choclo Al Comino, the recipe that I present to you today comes all the way from the fantastical land of Peru!
 
Peru, also called The Republic of Peru – home to the Incas, Machu Picchu and the Amazonian rainforest – is a place that I am sure has every traveller charmed. The country boasts of a rich culinary legacy as well, influenced by its indigenous people as well as the various immigrants who came to it in the later years.
 
Choclo Al Comino is the Peruvian way of eating corn, sauteed in butter, seasoned with salt and pepper, with a dash of cumin and lemon. It is so simple to make, yet a delight to tuck into, especially when served straight off the pan. This is now our family’s new favourite way of eating corn, too!
 
Check out the recipe for Choclo Al Comino or Peruvian-style corn with cumin and lemon, just in on my blog!

Keerai Poriyal| Rainbow Chard Stir-Fry

Until very recently, Rainbow Chard was something I only ever read about on international food blogs. It wasn’t readily available in India – it still isn’t, in the mainstream market. Now, thanks to Mapletree Farms from Hosur, I can do more than ogle at these colourful greens! I can actually cook with them, without having to shell out half of our household income on them!

I was thrilled to see the gorgeous variety of organically grown produce that Mapletree Farms had on offer, recently, at Ragi Kana, a very non-commercial weekly market that I have come to love. I just had to pick up some of the farm’s very fresh, very good-quality, very reasonably priced produce – Rainbow Chard included – and it has been an absolute delight working with them in my kitchen.

I used the Rainbow Chard leaves in a very Tamilian stir-fry, a Keerai Poriyal. This is an easy preparation, one that takes bare minutes to put together, and is quite a delicious way to get all the nutrition from those greens in.

Find the recipe for Keerai Poriyal, just in on my photo blog!

 

Mor Keerai| Keerai Mor Kootu

The first of the winter greens have started appearing in the markets, here in Bangalore. It is a soothing sight to see those lush, fresh greens piled up at the vegetable vendor’s. I love playing with leafy greens any day, and winter provides me just the perfect opportunity to cook with a variety of them. Spinach or palak is one of the most commonly used greens in India, and I present to you today a beautiful way to use them. Say hello to a traditional Tamilnadu recipe – Mor Keerai or Keerai Mor Kootu, using spinach.

Here, spinach is cooked and mixed with a freshly ground spice paste (that includes coconut and a few other ingredients), to which whisked curd is added later.

Check out my family recipe for Mor Keerai or Keerai Mor Kootu, just in on my blog!

Agathi Poo Poriyal| Vegetable Hummingbird Stir-Fry From Tamilnadu

Have you heard of the Vegetable Hummingbird, an edible flower called so because its shape resembles the beak of little hummingbirds? These flowers – called Dok Khae in Thai, Agathi Poo in Tamil, and Bokful in Bengali – possess several health benefits. They are quite commonly used in Thai, Indonesian, Vietnamese, Lao, Maldivian, Sri Lankan and, to an extent, Indian cuisine as well.
 
The Tamilians make a lip-smackingly delicious stir-fry with these flowers, called Agathi Poo Poriyal. With grated coconut, onions or beans, and a bit of sugar added in, the poriyal makes for an awesome accompaniment to piping hot rasam or sambar rice.
 
Read all about this wondrous flower, and find the recipe for the stir-fry, just in on my photo blog!