Gujarati Steamed Carrot Muthia| Gajar Na Muthiya

Are you looking for a delicious snack that you can enjoy without too much of guilt? If your answer to this question is ‘Yes’, these Gajar Na Muthiya or Carrot Muthia I tried out recently would be right up your alley. I’ll also add here that this is a super simple snack, an easy-peasy thing to whip up.

Check out the recipe, just in on my other blog!

Instant Khaman| Easy Khaman Recipe

It would be a tough task for me to choose a favourite from the Gujarati cuisine. I have a soft corner for the state’s food, and love most of what it has to offer. However, khaman definitely ranks high up there, amidst the top Gujarati foods I adore.

Today, I present to you the recipe for Instant Khaman, an easy one that you can go to in a pinch, which does not require any soaking or fermentation. I learnt this from a Gujarati family friend of ours years ago, and it never fails to yield soft, fluffy, delicious khaman.

Do check out the recipe on my other blog, along with some tips and tricks that I’ve learnt along the way!

Safed Dhokla| Gujarati White Dhokla Using Idli Batter

Today, I present to you the recipe for a Gujarati snack that goes by the name of Safed Dhokla (literally ‘white dhokla‘ in the local language).
 
This is one of the types of Dhokla commonly made in Gujarat, using idli batter. If you have idli batter on hand, it is a breeze to prepare these dhokla. They taste absolutely lovely, and are a highly nutritious snack to boot. Since they are steam-cooked, very little oil goes into them, making them perfect for weight-watchers. Safed Dhokla is a completely plant-based, vegan dish. In itself, this is a gluten-free dish as well.
 
The Safed Dhokla I have presented here is the most basic style – tempered with just mustard seeds and fresh coriander. At the end of my post, I have suggested a few different variations to the Safed Dhokla that you can try out, so you get a different-tasting snack every time you make it!
 
Check out the recipe, just in on my blog!

Gajar Mula Beet No Sambharo|Gujarati Root Vegetable Stir Fry Recipe

If you are looking for an easy-peasy, healthy and delish accompaniment for your meals this summer, this Gajar Mula Beet No Sambharo is it!

Sambharo‘ is the Gujarati version of a stir-fry, or a warm salad of sorts. It can be prepared using a variety of vegetables, and is super simple to prepare. The sambharo commonly makes an appearance as a part of the Gujarati thali, or is served alongside local snacks like fafda, thepla, khaman and dhokla.

This Gajar Mula Beet No Sambharo is made using the root vegetables of carrot, radish and beetroot. The very simple stir-fry that this is, it takes bare minutes to put together. Very little oil goes into it, the veggies cooked just enough to retain their crunch. The carrot, radish and beetroot meld together beautifully to create a delicious whole. What more can you ask for from a dish?

Check out the recipe, just in on my photo blog!

 

Moraiya Ni Khichdi| Samai Arisi Khichdi

Today, I present to you the recipe for Moraiya Ni Khichdi or Samai Arisi Khichdi, a Gujarati dish made using barnyard millet (moraiyo or moriyo in Gujarati, samai arisi in Tamil, sama ke chawal in Hindi).
 
A Gujarati friend of mine taught me how to make this delectable confection, many years ago, with potatoes and peanuts added to it for flavour, scented by ginger and green chillies, coriander and curry leaves, soured with curd. The Gujaratis refer to this dish as ‘Farali Khichdi‘, i.e. khichdi that can be eaten during fasting. I’m sure you will love this khichdi too, fast or no fast!
 
I absolutely adore Moraiya Ni Khichdi, and the husband loves it too. I make it often for breakfast or dinner – it is quite light on the stomach and easily digestible, perfect for the hot, hot, hot days prevailing in Bangalore right about now. What’s more, the little grain cooks super fast too. Tell me what is not to love, with this khichdi? 🙂
 
Check out the recipe for Moraiya Ni Khichdi, just in on my blog!
 
 

Experience The Flavours Of Winter With Rajdhani’s Swad Kesariya!

Winter is when you get out your shawls and sweaters and jackets. It is when you bundle up in warm blankets and spend entire days reading, gulping down cups of hot cocoa or chai. Winter is also the time to ogle at all those beautiful, beautiful Christmas trees and decorations that seem to be everywhere. Winter is also feasting time – when an abundance of gorgeous vegetables flood the markets, waiting to be converted into delectable, piping hot winter treats. For Bangaloreans, winter is also the time to feast on the delights at Rajdhani’s Swad Kesariya.

Swad Kesariya, the winter-special menu at Rajdhani, is a much anticipated affair in Bangalore every year. This year too, Rajdhani recently launched the winter menu, which I had the pleasure of sampling yesterday.

Read all about my experience sampling the winter-special menu at Rajdhani, just up on my photo blog!

Vatana Ni Kachori Chaat| Making Chaat From Matar Kachori

Winter is, slowly but surely, settling in in Bangalore. And one of the things that is synonymous with winter, for me, is the piping hot, home-made lilva kachoris that I grew up eating in Ahmedabad. With a gorgeous pigeon pea (fresh tuver) and/or fresh green peas (vatana), these kachoris had the power to brighten up a gloomy winter’s day – they still hold the same magic for me.

When the Foodie Monday Blog Hop team decided upon #ChaatsForDiwali as the theme for this week, I instantly knew that I had to make use of the fresh green peas that have begun to appear in the markets of Bangalore. The making of green pea kachoris aka Vatana Ni Kachori, and subsequently converting them into a chaat, came naturally.

So, here’s presenting to you Vatana Ni Kachori Chaat or Matar Kachori Chaat! Deep-fried, sinful, chatpata gorgeousness – that is this chaat for you. This beauty surely deserves to find pride of place in your Diwali party. Try it out, and I’m sure you will fall in love with it too!

Check out the recipe, just in on my photo blog!

Mug Nu Pani| Moong Bean Soup

Growing up in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, Mug Nu Pani or a thin soup made with whole green moong beans used to be the antidote to any and every ailment. It was advised for everything from broken bones and fever to general weakness and a broken heart. No wonder Mug Nu Pani spells out comfort food, heartiness and recovery to me! I love Mug Nu Pani, sick or not. It has saved my soul several times over, growing up, and still continues to do so.

To the uninitiated, a thin moong bean soup might sound very meh and uninteresting. Let me quickly assure you that this soup is anything but meh. At least, the Gujarati style of preparation makes this soup far from bland and dull. Mug Nu Pani is, in fact, quite a delicious soup, one choc-a-bloc with nutrition. It works wonders for the aged and infirm, growing children, and those who need a pick-me-up on a gloomy day. It isn’t very difficult to make, either.

Now, let’s check out the recipe for Mug Nu Pani aka Moong Bean Soup, the way a Gujarati neighbour or mine taught me to make it!

Gujarati Dalwada| Mixed Lentil Fritters

Right about now, the weather in Bangalore is perfect for deep-fried goodies – cloudy but bright mornings, followed by short showers in the evening. I absolutely had to dish up some Gujarati dalwada, one of my most favourite fried snacks!

If you have never had Gujarati dalwada before, you must absolutely try them out right away. They are so delightful – crunchy from the outside and soft on the inside, beautiful in taste. I have grown up eating them on rainy days and, even today, I cannot think of monsoon without thinking of these beauties. A newspaper cone full of these dalwadas, served with some fried green chillies and salt-soaked thinly sliced onions, spells out B-L-I-S-S to me.

Here’s a tried-and-tested recipe for delicious Gujarati dalwadas, the way a friend of mine taught me to make them!

Cheese & Chutney Corn On The Cob

Corn on the cob is a hugely popular snack across India, one you will find being sold on the streets almost everywhere. The most common way to eat it, though, is boiled or char-grilled, with a generous dose of salt/chaat masala/red chilli powder and lemon. Today, I present to you a different way of eating corn – Cheese & Chutney Corn On The Cob.

Check out the recipe, just in on my photo blog!